President's Day Sale

Sitewide » Feb. 15-16

VIEW OUR SPECIALS
TIKKA T3 BOLT HANDLE REPLACEMENT

Tikka Rifle Accessories – T3 Bolt Handle Replacement

It’s Jason McCann with MOUNTAIN TACTICAL®. Today, we’re going to be looking at the tactical oversized bolt handle by Hinterland Shooting Supply. This goes, will fit on the Tikka T3 rifles. It’s actually a very easy slip-on piece of equipment. And so, you can see here, very well machined, nice mixed stainless steel, mirrored finish, nice cared coted knob for durability, and the stainless steel matches the stainless steel on the bolt of the Tikka T3 extremely well. So let’s slip this on, show you how easy it is to install it. 

All right, so we’re going to show you how easy it is to put this bolt handle on, remove this old handle, these truly are modular guns – [00:01:00]socket did a great job in this design. So we’re going to rotate this around, move the [inaudible 00:01:06] and then we’re going to take this Allen wrench, we’re going to place it in this little slot right here. What it’s going to do is it’s going to allow us to rotate this in and not fully. All right, so we have our Allen wrench in place, we’re just going to rotate this around. You hear the first click, and we’re going to release the pressure on that spring, and I’ll pop this out. And you might want to take a moment to pull out your firing pin and see how stout this thing is. Be sure never to oil this, Tikka requires that there be no oil in here to function properly. So if you clean it, just make sure that you use a really good degreaser in here. So slide that back in there, take our new bolt handle, and these are very precision machine parts, it might take a little [00:02:00]  wiggling to get everything wind up correctly, we got it in there. Now, we have the leverage from our Allen wrench to get us up and over that big hump. We’re going to go all the way around, remove the Allen wrench, put our nice aluminum bolt shroud on, come back and we’re done. We have a nice new bolt handle, bolt [inaudible 00:02:23] much stronger than the original plastic pieces.

Tikka Rifle Accessories – T3 Single Shot Loading Device

It’s Jason McCann with MOUNTAIN TACTICAL®, here to look at an excellent new product called the Bobsled. It solves one of the major problems that us Tikka shooters have with the T3 as far as limited space in loading high-performance ammunition. As you Tikka shooters know, Tikka is great at providing high performance, high twist rifles, and 223 [inaudible 00:00:36] in a twist, you can shoot an ED Green Burger VLD through it. However, they don’t give you very much room in the magazine in order to load that round. And you can see in this 223 magazine, I’ve actually cut it out to be able to handle my Ed Green VLDs, but it took a lot of trial and error, spring, adjustments, everything, lots of time in my garage trying to make it work, and even then it doesn’t always feed correctly. 
Then you have 270 short mag with a 165 grand matrix ballistics, extremely long round, extremely long bullet. You can see in my short mag magazine I’ve actually cut it out and modified it as well to be able to take the longer round. And then you have rounds like the 7 mm Remington mag which again you put a high-performance VLD bullet in there and you run out of magazine space. This is one of the downfalls of the Tikka system, extremely accurate rifles, limited magazine space. Luckily, Bobsled fixed that, we have this simple to install product, you slide it in your magazine, it centers the round for you and ramps it into the chamber and works in the 223, works in your short mag, works in your or 30 odd six or 300 win mag, 700 win mag or 338 win mag magazine, and then it just pops right out. So we have a 223 here, so we’re just going to put it right in the 223, load the magazine up, take a snapshot, I’m just going to throw it in the chamber. Those of you who know, you can’t do that with just the magazine in there, close the bolt, shoot it, open rounded jacks, throw the round in the chamber, close the bolt, shoot it, rounded jacks. It’s an incredibly innovative product solving one of the biggest problems that we have with the Tikka T3, and we’re very excited to have it here at the MOUNTAIN TACTICAL®. 
All right, so we’re out here at our favorite range in Logan, Montana. And we have the bobsled in here just to show you how well it works in the real world. Throw it in, catch the round, throw in another one, just a fantastic little tool here. It’s worked flawlessly so far, I’ve put 35 rounds through it, hasn’t given me a problem yet. So definitely a winner here with the bobsled. [inaudible 00:03:45] as we were testing our bobsled in this as well, and for me [inaudible 00:03:52] 223 without a problem putting a nice fat short mag in there, and so far I’ve put about 20 rounds on top of this sled and it hasn’t failed once with this nice fat caliber. So I’d say the bobsled is quickly becoming one of our favorite products here. All right, we’ll see how we do. 

Tikka T3 Bolt Shroud Replacement

Hi, this is Jason McCann from MOUNTAIN TACTICAL®. Today, we have the Hinterland Shooting Supply replacement bolts shroud for the Tikka T3 595 and 695, it works on all three guns. This is a very good looking piece of equipment here, a piece of machining, [inaudible 00:00:30] excellent machine work on it. You don’t see any of the machining lines on here, has a nice coat of care coat on the gun. The lines follow the lines of the receiver, so it’s a nice cosmetic piece as well as a functional piece. We actually had a client that had a 17 Remington and 595 that he kept cracking his plastic bolts shroud. Truth be told, he was loading his rounds too hot, but the [00:01:00] expanding gases were actually cracking as plastic bolts shroud. This is made of aluminum, nice sturdy piece, and he hasn’t had any issues with his bolt shroud since. So we’re going to put this on the gun, show you how easy it is to install, and take it out to the ranch. 

So what do you have here, I’m going to flip this over and you can see, we have this is a large detent right here. Do not turn this towards the large detent. You will actually unload the spring and the firing pin, and unless you’re Hercules, you’re going to have a really tough time pulling, rotating this back around. So what you’re going to do is you’re just going to take your handle, hold on to it nice and tight, and you’re actually going to rotate this away from this large detent, away from the handle, it’s going to rotate nice and smooth until it won’t rotate anymore, and then this is just going to slide right off. We’re then going to take our new one, slide it on here, a [00:02:00] little pressure, and we’re going to slide it back to until you hear the first click. As soon as you hear the first click, don’t stop, turn, or don’t turn any longer, you get into this deep well here, like I said, you are going to have… 

Tikka T3 Bolt Stop Modification

One question we get quite often on our forum is since the Tikka has every action is a long action on the T3, why can’t people take a long action magazine to load their 308 and load them out, put some VLD bullets and have plenty of mag space. The limiting factor is this bolt stop. As it’s adjusted for the short action calibers, the bolt stop is moved further forward on the inside of here, for long action calibers it’s moved back. Now, Beretta imports, it’s made by Sako, but they import a kit to the US here at $65, very expensive, very hard to get. That comes with two different bolts stop, both the short action and the long action. It’s a very simple conversion, it’s also something that’s very easy for you to do yourself. So we’re going to actually go in and I’m going to show you a bolt stop that I’ve personally modified here. 
So in order to remove this, you just pull out this pin, make sure you have pressure on the bolt stop because it is spring loaded, take a small plier, pull it out, put the pin in one of your trays, very carefully remove the pressure and the bolt stop. And this little spring is what you want to be careful of. First time I took this part, it hit my garage floor, it took me forever to find it. So I’m going to take this little spring out now, put it in one of my trays. Now, this is a bolt stop that I modified. This is my 270 short mag. I wanted to be able to load VLD bullets in it, it had the stock moved closer to the front and on 223, 308, 243, any of those calibers, the bolt stop stops about right here. And on the newer Tikkas, you actually see a square where it’s cut out to this point right here. So I did is I just took a file and went with a course file, took the metal out and then took a real fine file to put a nice mirror finish on it, so it works very smoothly, and then put it back on. To put it back on, again, being very careful, this little spring right here, you don’t want to lose it, it’s a $65 replacement kit for this bolt stop combo, and not very many of them may come to the US here, so definitely not something you want to lose. So keep some pressure on that, take your pin, put it back in this hole, and it might take a little fidgeting but when you get it just lined up, it drops in just like so, relieve the pressure, you’re done, your bolt stop… 

Tikka T3 Bolt Handle and Bolt Shroud Swap

All right, one of our most popular products is the Hinterland Shooting Supplies’ bolt shroud and Tactical Handle. And so you can see here I put the Sako piece of plastic knob on the end of my handle, that’s great, it adds a lot of tactile feel, but it’s $45, I mean, it’s just ridiculous. And then you have to pay shipping on top of that to Beretta here in the US, and for a piece of plastic, you should really get something for your money. So what we’re going to do here is show you how easy it is to replace this plastic bolt shroud with a nice aluminum bolt shroud, it’s much stronger, and how easy it is to replace the bolt handle here. So what you have here, I’m going to flip this over, and you can see we have, this is a large [00:01:00] detent right here. Do not turn this towards the large detent, you will actually unload the spring and the firing pin. And unless you’re Hercules, you’re going to have a really tough time pulling, rotating this back around. So what you’re going to do is you’re just going to take your handle, hold on to it nice and tight, and you’re actually going to rotate this away from this large detent, away from the handle, it’s going to rotate nice and smooth until it won’t rotate anymore, and then this is just going to slide right off. We’re then going to take our new one, slide it on here, a little pressure and we’re going to slide it back to until you hear the first click. As soon as you hear the first click, don’t stop, turn – or don’t turn any longer, you get into this deep well here, like I said, you’re going to have.

All right, so we’re going to show you how easy it is to put this bolt handle on, remove this old handle. These truly are modular guns. Sako did a great job in this design. So we’re going to rotate this around, move the shroud [00:02:00] And then we’re going to take this Allen wrench, we’re going to place it in this little slot right here. What it’s going to do is it’s going to allow us to rotate this in and not fully depressurize that spring. All right, so we have our Allen wrench in place, we’re just going to rotate this around, you hear the first click, we’re going to release the pressure on that spring, kind of pop this out, and you might want to take a moment to pull out your firing pin and see how stout this thing is. Be sure never to oil this, Tikka requires that there be no oil in here to function properly. So if you clean it, just make sure that you use a really good degreaser in here. So slide that back in there, take our new bolt handle, and these are very precision machine parts, it might take a little wiggling to get everything lined up correctly, we got it in there. Now, [00:03:00] we have a leverage from our Allen wrench to get this up and over that big hump. We’re going to go all the way around, remove the Allen wrench, put our nice aluminum bolt shroud on, come back, and we’re done. We have a nice new bolt handle, bolt shroud, much stronger than the original plastic pieces.

Making a 5c Adapter Plate for the HRC160

Hey. Jason McCann here from MOUNTAIN TACTICAL®, and we’re trying something new. I’ve never done a solo video where someone wasn’t manning the camera, but we’ve had tons of requests for us to keep up on video and I’ve done a really bad job of that. So I figured I just grab the camera and see how this turns out. We’ve had a lot of requests to have more manufacturing style videos to actually see stuff being made. So we have a unique situation today and have to make a one-off part. So I figured it’d be a great opportunity to kind of show you what we’re doing. So come over here by the machines, and we just made a few hundred bottom metal over here. And the next step is to make the mag catch. 

The mag catch fixture [00:01:00] went with our 5c rotary table. And that’s off at Haas being repaired right now. Some of you guys who’ve been following us know that one of our machines just had a major meltdown in the software destroyed a lot of stuff. Haas had to come out here, literally take it apart, rebuild it, and the rotary table is the last piece we’re waiting on. Well, they’ve all this bottom metal. Obviously, you guys want it in your hands. So we’re going to make an adapter. I went out and bought a 5c just standalone column and we’re going to adapt it put to make an adapter plate to go on this new rotary. 

We have, let’s even get that in the camera. There we go. There’s a new rotary that we have. So, obviously, this doesn’t match up. Let me grab this. Here’s there’s no way to attach this. [00:02:00] We have to create an intermediary place. So I figured I’d show you guys how I’m going to do this. We get these mag catches made and gets this bottom metal out and in your guys’ hands. So welcome to the journey.

All right. So everything we design we first have to design virtually. We use SolidWorks here at the shop and we design a 3D model. We’re able to do a significant amount of our engineering stress test everything actually inside the software which is really cool. But then we have to once we’ve kind of debugged it as much as we can, we get down and we machine it. And I had made a part like this before because I had to make our rails, I have a trunnion table to tilt the table, the machine table at the 20 mo ways to make our 20 mo rails.

[00:03:00] And so I had to make an adapter plate. It has keyways here. It has around the boss. It goes into the bore of the rotary the hold through. And I just took this design and adapted it for this 5c adapter. And so we have counterbores back here. So we’re going to have screws that go through the back to the front to screw into that adapter. And then on the other side, there are two grooves on the back of that 5c adapter plate, and so we’re going to hold concentricity using that. So we’re going to cut this groove here. 

The next challenge is how do we get it on and off the bigger rotary table. And so we have to cut these reliefs so we can have the bolts come through to the keyway where they’ll be T nuts holding that to the rotary. [00:04:00] But because the 5c would cover those screw holes, I need to be able to get in here with a wrench. And so cut a nice wide groove so I can actually get in there and turn the wrench. And so we’ll seem like there’s a one-off part. Never, never made it before. And hopefully, it works. So let’s get down to the machine and go cuts now.

All right. So we’re back downstairs, I saw the model upstairs [00:04:35 inaudible] goes on the back of the 5c. And we’re going to make it out of this chunk of 6061 right here. So just as we use to make a lot of our fixtures. We had a line around the shop. So this is going to come at an intermediary surface for our rotary over here on the other machine. So let’s get to the machine.

All right. So [00:05:00] we have our metal end device. Before we do anything, I go through my tool list and I touch them off before every single new run. I want to make sure, you know, things change. Things break. It allows you to inspect your tools before you actually go into the job. And make sure everything’s just dialed in perfect.

This is a great roughing tool and indexable on one inch and mill. I got from Curtis over at the tool source and we hauled some serious metal with this thing. It has three spindle coiling capabilities. And quite honestly, I don’t run it as hard as it could be run simply because there’s really no need to. As you’ll see here shortly, it removes a lot of material really fast. No sense, no sense going, you know, the one that potentially breaking an insert [00:06:00] and ruining a part. So that costs you a lot of time. So it’s measuring the outside diameter because as you cut with cutting surface wears down, and so this measures everything within ten-thousandths of an inch just to make sure everything’s just dead nuts. Perfect. So, we’re going to go in. We’re going to touch off every tool. Make sure everything’s dialed and you’re right back again. 

[00:07:00] All right. So what we’re doing is we’re getting as centered as possible on the workpiece and we’re going to let the probe dial this thing in for us. 

[00:08:00] Our x dimension is 6.5 inches. Our y dimension is 6 inches on the nose. We’re going to go down from where we’re currently three-quarters of an inch and we’ll go from there. 

[00:09:00] Nice. Now we’re centered on our stock. We’re just going to go touch off our Z-axis. We’re saying roughly 250,000 parts. Excellent. So we have our part zero. Moved the probe out of the way before we damage it. There you go. See what we can do. 

All right. Also, we’re probably going to skim our soft jaws. That’s okay. Soft jaws are just currently [00:10:00] disposable. That’s what they’re there for. But we’re making a really thick part. We are using a lot of this material. I kind of went into it expecting that. So let’s see what happens when we go. I’m going to start out slow on the rapids just to make sure all our depths are correct. And then speed it up once. I know everything’s touching off where it’s supposed to.

[00:13:18] All right, well some reason, zooming in, zoom in here. Ooh, too much area. Our finishing pass didn’t get coated on that surface. So let me go back upstairs, figure out why that didn’t get done. Other than that, it looks like it’s dead nuts. We’ll try it on the fixture. See how it turned out, but I will be right back.

Okay, back down here. So yeah, for whatever reason that finishing pass for this surface [00:14:00] didn’t make it on the last code. So we’re just going to run that and should be good to go. We’ll measure it, make sure it’s good and then flip it over to the other side.  

It is a very versatile tool. You can run it fast and hard, remove a lot of material really fast. [00:14:37 inaudible] was the cubic inches per minute that we were running earlier was, but I want to say it’s somewhere around 75 to 80, just remove a lot of material really fast. Let me come back around take more of a finishing style. I got to slow it down and we got a [00:15:00] really, really nice surface. Doesn’t do good on sidewalks, but it does really well on finishing floors. Yeah. That’s [00:15:42 inaudible] a couple of measurements. See where we are at.

All right. Well, let’s get on the calipers. Let’s on mics, [00:16:00] let’s throw it on the other rotary and just make sure it fits. I’m not sure how to film this exactly without covering up what I’m doing. But here’s what we made in that first operation, right surface finish, and then we have spindle bore here, and that’s what this boss is going to go into. And then we have these little dots here. In the second operation, we’re going to drill holes through these little T nuts that go in here. Bolts come through here. Going to walk this all together. Because we want this to go up against this face with absolutely zero put. You can see once that locks in, nothing perfect as the exact fit that we want. So I’d say it’s safe to say we can machine the other side of this. Let’s go back over the DM.

[00:17:00] All right. So I have a powerful tool in our vise. The first thing we’re going to do is we are going to grab this upper corner and we’re going to take the hat off and the hat off is that’s all the material that we used to hold the part in the first operation. So we are going to come down here, grab this corner, face this off. Make sure we have the correct thickness on the part. Doesn’t take a few passes. I speed the video up to this because it is kind of boring stuff, but [00:17:42 inaudible].

[00:18:13] All right. We’re back. Now we got that.  Got that hat off. We are going to this center. So the reason why I designed flats on this instead of going perfectly around was simply so I could just use a standard set of soft jaws and save me at a time of mega set around soft jaws. And it gives me a great on indicating points to go off of here. So there’s more than one way to skin a cat. It’s not a critical dimension. There’s no meeting surface there. So I just went with it.

[00:19:00] Excellent. I’ll pull up our programs, switch off our tools. We’ll be good to go.

All right. Here we go. I’m going to slow the rapids down, make sure we’re in the right spot. All right.

[00:20:19] Oh nice. You want to hit the finishing [00:20:22 inaudible]. 

[00:21:06] See what we got here. So we want no put. That is just dead nuts. So you know the other side is concentric to the bore on our rotary. This ring is concentric to the bore on this adapter and this ring is concentric to the bore on the other side. So we’ll get it all put together here and we put our cards right.

[00:22:00] We’ll be good to go. All right. Well, here we go. We got it all installed, how to do a design modification, made a separate part, but in the end, it’s pretty much the same thing. But we now have an adapter plate from our HRC160 to the 5c adapter. So we’ll be able to get those mag catches going. I dialed it in. We have roughly one and a half thousand run out along the face here. So anyway, so what we’re doing and once we get that fixture in there, I’ll be able to adjust that and get that going. 

So anyways guys a little different type of video today. Let me know if you like it. If you like seeing the kind of little nitty-gritty kind of stuff, the detailed stuff that we do on a day in and day out basis, let me know. I’ll shoot more of these videos.

And then just as far as you know product reviews and introductions and how-to videos, I’ll definitely do a better job doing those as well. 

[00:23:00] So, anyway, I got some mag catches to make, so we can get these final metal done. You guys have a great one. See you next time.

NEW TOOLS IN THE SHOP

New Tools in the Shop

Hey, Jason McCann here again from MOUNTAIN TACTICAL®. You guys really liked the last kind of making it video. So I thought I’d show you a little bit more about making it, show you some cool new tools that we have. Show them off. May help some of you guys in your manufacturing. If nothing else, it’s just kind of cool. So let’s come over and take a look at these things.

So what we have here is a new tool from AB Tooling. And what it is is it’s a Picatinny rail cutter. It cuts that entire profile at once. Now, why is this significant? Well, this is significant because this replaces four operations that use these tools. Now I got to say I love these tools, especially [00:01:00] this guy right here. This is a tool from Big Daishowa in Japan. It’s the same tool that Nightforce uses to make their Picatinny rails. Had great success with it. It just rips. I’m able to cut, I want to say 20,000 per tooth. And basically, I want to say 2900 SFM or something like that. I really like this fast spindle over here on the DMT. And it rips through the metal incredibly fast. And I’ll show you a small clip of that here in a second. 

And then we have this guy, which is a QC cutter and this cuts the undercut. So what you have to do is you have to cut the top angle with this guy, then you turn around, cut the undercut with this guy, then you got to switch tools again, cut the bottom angle with this guy and then do a cleanup pass. So multiple operations and you get a little tool that comes in from the side [00:02:00] to make sure that the side finish is really nice. I love it. It’s fast. It’s effective. But the AB Tooling guy came over and he said, “Hey, why don’t you try this? This is what a lot of guys are switching to.” And my conclusion is it’s designed for machines with low spindle RPM. They said the sweet spot is 6,000 RPM, and 1 to 2,000 per tooth. And this is a three flute cutter.

I’m running about 1200 SFM, which translates to I want to say around 10,000 RPM plus or minus a little bit. And I’m roughing at 2,000 per tooth and finishing at 1,000 per tooth. And quite honestly, I’m getting the exact same amount of or the exact same machine time as using those guys. The advantage is it’s just all done with one tool, [00:03:00] very consistent. Yesterday, I cut 150 rails with this, and it just still has an amazing shine on it. I tested it with our Renishaw probe, and it hasn’t worn down 110 thousandths of an inch yet. So we could probably push this harder, but we’d end up sacrificing a little bit of quality here. So let me show you how this guy runs. 

Okay. So we have our AB tool in the spindle. And one other advantage that I forgot to mention earlier is this tool has a very low spindle load on it. So when we’re cutting, the spindle is not working hard. The highest it goes is 8%, sometimes 9%, and then finishing it’s at 3 or 4%. 

Now, why is this important? We’re not overworking our machine. Machines or mechanical devices these spindles will wear out if you run them too hard. [00:04:00] So compared to the other tools which are faster, they have a 30 to 40% spindle load because we can drive them so hard. This does the same job in the same amount of time, less stress on the machine. 

Again, I think this tool was designed for somebody who is a Tormach user or someone who has a mini-mill or somebody whose machine maxes out at around 6,000 rpm. That’s the sweet spot for this tool. We’re able to run this tool a little harder simply because our machine is more rigid than those machines. Listen to how quiet that is. It’s just not working

[00:04:44 inaudible] 7 to 8% spindle load here. Yeah. It just spiked at 9%. So, a very low energy tool. We come in for a finishing pass. [00:05:00] And this is cutting at one [00:05:13 inaudible] on the finishing pass 1200 SFM puts us at 9550 for the RPMs just turns right along. 

So this is a really cool tool. I think we’ll definitely use it heavily in aluminum and then we’ll use the Big Daishowa tool. And it is significantly more expensive. This cutter we’re using right now runs approximately $160. I bought two, so I got a little bit of a break. That Big Daishowa doubling cutter, I want to say, I would say I bought it a little over a year ago. It was almost $800. I want to say it was like $770 [00:06:00] and each insert is $20. Take four inserts. The inserts last forever. The inserts that you saw earlier in the video, those have made roughly 1600 rails and shown no sign of wearing.

So pretty cool tools. Expensive, huge upfront cost, but this one does the same thing except significantly less expensive. That QC cutter is another expensive tool. [00:06:32 inaudible] $100 for that tool. So the combined cost of those that another tooling is roughly $1,000 where this does the same job for around $160. 

So I definitely think AB Tool has a little wearing if you’re making Picatinny rails if you’re making copper receivers, anything where you need that Picatinny profile, [00:07:00] this is going to make your life a lot easier. So we finish this up and then I’ll show you how fast that Big Daishowa cuts. And that’s another tool because I didn’t laugh because it’s just so fast. It’s still fun to watch. 

I’m going to pause this guy, clean up the window. [00:08:00] We’ll speed ahead. I’m running at 2,640 SFM. And we’re cutting 20,000 per tooth equates to a cutting speed of almost 900 [00:08:35 inaudible]. Just kind of fun.

Here’s another cool tool we just got from MariTool. And our new DM2 has Thru Spindle Coolant. And the advantage of Thru Spindle Coolant is you can buy tools that have ports in them where the coolant actually goes through the tool and [00:09:00] always has coolant flushing out chips right at the cutting surface. 

Now, I did a lot of research and there are endmills out there that do this, but this machine also has P cool and gave you special tool holders, special collets, everything else to run. For endmills, you really need a shrink-fit tool holder and the good ones are off the charts expensive. 

So while I have some roughing tools that have Thru Spindle Coolant, I went ahead and bought this drill from MariTool has Thru Spindle Coolant. And I don’t know if we can really get in there and see this, but there are two. Let’s see if I can get this to focus here. There are two tiny holes at the tip of this drill. Now, why is it so important when drilling? While drilling, you are bearing your cutting tool into the metal typically [00:10:00] multiple times the diameter of the drill and chips get caught in the flutes. They can evacuate quickly enough and you end up snapping off the drill and the part ruins the part, ruins the drill. Especially if you’re running carbide drills, they’re very expensive. Not as expensive as this guy. This guy was I want to say around $90 most expensive drill that I’ve ever purchased. But this is so flipping fast because you have coolant on the cutting surface constantly pushing up escaping through these flutes and blowing the chips out. So it really you just got to see it to believe it. I mean, this thing is just so flipping fast. I think you guys are going to really enjoy this. So let’s move over to the mill and cut some metal. 

All right. So I went ahead and paused this. And you can see the Thru Spindle Coolant drill is in the tool holder right now. I’m going to want 5% rapids to slow everything down. So you can actually see when that coolant [00:11:00] kicks in and they will kick it up to full speed. So I’m going to zoom in a little closer. Try to get this in focus. 

All right. Let’s get this going. Isn’t that fast? All right. I’m going to turn this over to zoom back out. All right. Setting on the camera. We are going to go 100% here. First time I ran this I was clenching my teeth. But now I just laugh at it. [00:12:00] You can see that cool engineering done through there. So anyways, fun stuff to show you guys. 

Well, I hope you thought that was fun. This is kind of fun. Obviously hit like. Let me know if you liked this, these types of videos, and I’ll show you more of them. And I have 650 more rails to make. So I better get to work. Have a great weekend, guys.

Company

Mountain Tactical Company logo Tikka T3x Accessories
MOUNTAIN TACTICAL® exists to carry tradition and inspire innovation by providing precision products to the everyday shooter.

Policy

ShippingInternational ShippingReturnsTerms & Conditions
Privacy Policy
Cookie Policy
Tikka T3x Rifles. Copyright © 2020 MOUNTAIN TACTICAL® COMPANY. All rights reserved.
cartphone-handsetmap-markerclockmagnifierchevron-down linkedin facebook pinterest youtube rss twitter instagram facebook-blank rss-blank linkedin-blank pinterest youtube twitter instagram